Put tech policy on the argument phase – mySanAntonio.com

Put tech policy on the argument phase – mySanAntonio.com

By Blair Morris

September 23, 2019

By Adira Levine, For the Express-News

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  • Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro, Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., Andrew Yang, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio are introduced before the second of two Democratic presidential primary debates hosted by CNN in the Fox Theatre in Detroit, July 31. Cybersecurity and technology should be discussed intently during the next debate, Sept. 12. Photo: Paul Sancya /Associated Press / Copyright 2src19 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

    Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., former Real estate and Urban Advancement Secretary Julian Castro, Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., Andrew Yang, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio are presented before the second of two Democratic governmental primary arguments hosted by CNN in the Fox Theatre in Detroit, July31 Cybersecurity and innovation should be gone over intently throughout the next dispute, Sept. 12.

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    Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., former Real estate and Urban Advancement Secretary Julian Castro, Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Kamala Harris,

    … more

    Photo: Paul Sancya/ Associated Press.

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Image: Paul Sancya/ Associated Press.

Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., previous Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro, Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., previous Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., Andrew Yang, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee and New York City Mayor Costs de Blasio are introduced before the second of 2 Democratic presidential primary arguments hosted by CNN in the Fox Theatre in Detroit, July31 Cybersecurity and innovation need to be talked about intently throughout the next debate, Sept. 12.

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Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., previous Real estate and Urban Advancement Secretary Julian Castro, Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Kamala Harris,

… more

Photo: Paul Sancya/ Associated Press.

In 4 nights of Democratic presidential arguments this summertime, candidates and mediators discussed expert system a weak total of 3 times and omitted the topic of election security completely. Compare this to health care, which was referenced in between 40 and 80 times per debate.

Innovation and cybersecurity-related subjects might not yet carry the smash hit appeal of decades-old argument essentials, however they command widespread public acknowledgment and will increasingly concern embody and specify the concerns with which the next president should grapple. Throughout the 3rd dispute of the 2020 election cycle, mediators ought to press candidates on cybersecurity and other major technology-related obstacles.

Treating innovation policy as separated from the neighborhoods and systems with which it converges is not just misrepresentative of the fact however likewise downright unsafe. As innovation sends effective ripples throughout society, candidates must demonstrate their command of the multifaceted issues at play and the range of stakeholder interests and issues involved.

One fertile ground for technology policy discussion lives in the generous overlap in between technology policy and traditional policy problems: Intrigued in talking about job development? Address cyber labor force development. Development? Want to 5G. Privacy? Think about data security guidelines. Candidates need to discuss barriers to accessing innovation in low-income locations or their strategies to protect vital infrastructure from cyberattacks.

Mediators must likewise ask candidates the difficult questions: Under what situations would you consider releasing offensive cyber capabilities against an adversary? Do you support using facial acknowledgment systems by police in U.S. cities?

Given the social, economic and security repercussions of these problems, it is paramount the general public comprehends candidate positions on these issues and evaluates who is best geared up to address them.

In addition, technology policy problems produce a great argument. Candidate remarks on these topics carry a novelty that may render them much more illuminating than discussions of subjects openly probed day in, day out.

While we have actually begun to hear ideas of technology policy discussions on the national phase– mostly from entrepreneur Andrew Yang in the 2nd round of disputes– the variety of candidates, pundits and moderators discussing it is too few, and the primary focus on automation too narrow. The near exemption of other tech-related topics oversimplifies conversations about the multifarious effects of technology and leaves important nuance out of policy conversations. Innovation policy need not dominate the debate stage, but it merits greater prospect analysis in keeping with its outsize influence on society and problems crucial to the general public.

The next Democratic argument on Sept. 12 must work as the invitation for prospects to fully accept conversations of how technology will impact the society in which they will lead if chosen– and the manner in which they will govern with regard to such problems. Let the discussion start.

Adira Levine is a Cybersecurity Policy Fellow at New America and former specialist to U.S. federal government policymakers.

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